Tuesday, 6 May 2014

Computer Info



Hi My Self BANSH BAHADUR DUBEY,
  
I Introduce The Latest NewInformaction In Computer World


A

Gmail gets new feature for photos
Google is rolling out a new feature to Gmail that will allow users to insert photos backed up from their smartphones.
NEW DELHI: Google is rolling out a new feature to Gmail that will allow users to insert photos backed up from their smartphones, while composing emails.

With an intent to encourage users to synchronize pictures captured through their mobile phones with the Google cloud, Gmail will now feature an 'Insert Photo' button in the compose window on the service's web interface. "Starting today, you can save time and insert your Auto Backup photos from your phone into Gmail messages on the web using the new Insert Photo button," said Thijs van As, Product Manager, Gmail, in a blog post.

On clicking the 'Insert Photo' button, users will be able to access all photos backed up from their mobile devices including the most recent ones.

Users who upload and organize their photos into albums through the Google Photos app, will also be able to share entire albums through the feature. They'll also be able to resize images while composing messages by dragging on any corner to edit the snapshot picture.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/photo/33816272.cms

To utilize the feature users will need to turn on the Auto Backup feature on their devices. On Android devices, it can be enabled through the Photos app. On iOS, the same can be done through the Google+ app.To Auto Backup photos on desktops, users will need to install the Google+ Auto Backup for desktop app.

Google has been focusing on photo related features for quite some time, now. Earlier this year, it had introduced the ability to zoom to 100% and add an HDR effect to photos on Google+.In October 2013, it had introduced new editing and search tools to the social network.
'The new Firefox is fantastic'
Mozilla has just released the latest upgrade to Firefox, its popular open-source browser.
RELATED
Mozilla has just released the latest upgrade to Firefox, its popular open-source browser. We're at version 29 now, which as software goes is pretty long in the tooth.

Over the last few years, Firefox began to show its age. When it was first unveiled, back in 2002, Mozilla's browser was unquestionably better than Microsoft's Internet Explorer, which at the time enjoyed a near monopoly share of the browser market. But as Firefox became more popular, its designers stuffed it with too many features.

I was a Firefox devotee until about the end of the last decade, when it finally became too ungainly to bear. Google's Chrome, lithe and quick as a frightened gazelle, offered a more hassle-free path to the web.

But when I first opened Firefox 29, which became available earlier this week, I felt a surge of nostalgia. It instantly reminded me of what I liked best about the open-source browser in its heyday.

For one thing, it's beautiful. Like Chrome, Mozilla's redesigned web browser is aesthetically spare, but it isn't anodyne. With curved tabs and a set of thoughtfully designed, slightly amusing icons, Firefox's new design suggests an air of friendly accessibility . Opening it up is like running into an old friend who had gone astray; he's cleaned up, gotten his act together, and now he's ready to escort you on a journey across the web. Should you join him? That's where things get dicier.

THANKS FOR WATCH AND COMMENT,
         Bansh Bahadur Dubey

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